At the April 28th RDOS Planning and Development Committee meeting, Area F Director Michael Brydon made a motion to establish a Conservation Fund that would be a sub-regional service in the South Okanagan. The proposed fund would requisition $10 per household per year on average for a period of five years to support conservation projects. The fund is proposed to be guided by a Technical Committee,  and be application-based so organizations could apply to undertake the work. Local government directors would make final decisions on fund allocations.

The motion followed a presentation by SOSCP Program Manager Bryn White, with special guest David Hillary former Program Manager of the Kootenay Conservation Program. Hillary’s presentation highlighted the process of establishing the first Conservation Fund in Canada both in the east and central Kootenays, including the environmental, community and financial benefits such a fund has brought to the region.

The motion for a sub-regional service in the South Okanagan is an invitation to all five electoral areas and four member municipalities, and Brydon’s comments were encouraging an opportunity for the Board to think and act regionally, thereby increasing their total impact by working together.

The motion was brought forward yesterday at the RDOS Board meeting for agreement, but was removed for consent and deferred to the second Board meeting in June. This provides an opportunity for individual councils to discuss their participation in the proposed sub-regional service, or perhaps an opportunity to establish stand-alone funds of their own.

Wild sheep share a number of similarities with their domestic cousins. Unfortunately, contact between the two groups can have deadly consequences. Managing livestock/ wildlife conflicts on private land is a daunting task. The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation has supported the Sheep Separation Program for nearly a decade, including the program’s provincial coordinator, Jeremy Ayotte. The Wild Sheep Working Group is made up of domestic sheep producers, biologists, and hunters. “One of our goals is to monitor the different strategies we’re trialing, and then share our success stories, within the province and beyond,” stated Ayotte. “Historically, the program’s had its ups and downs, but now that we’ve got some stability through funding, there’s a perceivable buzz: you can really feel the momentum starting to pick up.” Read the full article on the HCTF web site. 

The Real Estate Foundation of BC is pleased to share the first two videos from the “Project Spotlight Series” profiling the important work that the Foundation has supported across the province. The SOSCP video highlights the collaborative work of Okanagan Similkameen conservation partners. Check it out on YouTube–you may be in it! Thanks to Michael Bezener, Dick Cannings and many other partners who submitted photos for the video. Link to video.

The Real Estate Foundation of BC is pleased to share the first two videos from the “Project Spotlight Series” profiling the important work that the Foundation has supported across the province. The SOSCP video highlights the collaborative work of Okanagan Similkameen conservation partners. Check it out on YouTube–you may be in it! Thanks to Michael Bezener, Dick Cannings and many other partners who submitted photos for the video. Link to video.

 

Invasive species are a major concern in the South Okanagan as they pose a threat to the biodiversity that we have here in the valley. This Royal BC Museum exhibit is part of the Penticton Museum & Archives’s celebration of local and natural history in 2012.